The Master’s Degree in Public Archaeology is a 2 year program of coursework and practical application designed to prepare students for a range of professional positions. The degree is offered through the Anthropology Department and in conjunction with the Public Archaeology Facility (PAF). Our focus is on the intersection between archaeology and its many publics. As such, graduates can expect to find employment in both the private and governmental sectors, including federal, state, tribal, and local agencies, engineering firms, environmental firms, architectural design companies, and energy companies. Education- and museum-based archaeologists work for schools, agencies that define policies for educational initiatives, heritage organizations that work directly with descendant communities, institutions that award and administer grants, and museums that are both privately and publicly funded. [Learn More] or  [MAPA Facebook]

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The Columbian Geography of Binghamton

As state employees and school children around the country enjoy their four-day work weeks, we at MAPA could not call ourselves a public archaeology blog without a series deconstructing Columbus Day. I am back, with my colleagues Andy Pragacz and Katie Seeber, to talk about Columbus monuments. Obviously monuments, particularly of Confederate soldiers, have seized national and local news lately, and many archaeologists have commented on the controversy: Rosemary Joyce and Paul Mullins, to name a few. As Columbus Day approached, many statues of Christopher Columbus were similarly ­­­­­­­­­questioned. Baltimore’s monument to Christopher Columbus, the first monument to the man in the United States, was smashed in August of this year. After recent vandalism of similar monuments in New York City, police are guarding the Columbus Circle monument in Manhattan from future attacks. Some in Minneapolis have suggested that a statue of Prince should replace their Columbus monument. In our own city of Binghamton, the statue of Christopher Columbus that adorns the Broome County Court House was spray painted “murderer” twice.  An event tossing bologna at a cutout of Columbus was held in Binghamton’s Columbus (or Bologna) park this week. This not the only monument to Columbus in the Binghamton area. [Read More]

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