Tag Archives: Queer Archaeology

Queer Archaeology and the Public

In last week’s post I discussed the necessity of taking queer archaeology into the field and laboratory because these are where archaeology “happens”. However, there is a significant portion of the archaeological process that I ignored in that post – engaging with the public. All archaeology should be public archaeology to some degree; if we are not making an impact on people outside of the academy, then at best archaeology is a hobby, and at worst it’s irrelevant. Thus, if queer archaeology is to make the impact that I am sure that it can, it must be willing and able to engage with its various publics. This is no easy task. “Queer”, like many of our other favorite academic terms such as “feminism” and “Marxism” are rife with social and political tension.  In addition, queer archaeologists are people too. In attempting to take their work to the public, they are exposing themselves to the kinds of reactions queer individuals experience in other social situations. These two issues – how do queer archaeologists disseminate their work to non-archaeologists and how do queer archaeologists protect themselves – will be my concern for this post. Taking Queer Archaeology Outside of the Academy Queer archaeologists [Read More]

Queer Theory and Archaeology

Last October, my fellow graduate student Trish Markert discussed the sociopolitics of gender within archaeology and its potential impact on our contemporary sociopolitical landscape. In her post, she briefly addressed the manner in which queer archaeologists gives our field the ability to challenge normative assumptions – and she promised a more thorough discussion of queer theory to come. Well, that time is finally here! Over the next few weeks, I will be discussing several facets of queer theory’s incorporation into archaeology, and its power to radically change our perception of the past and present. Why Should I Care About Queer Archaeology? Queer archaeologies are especially important in these uncertain times. The Trump administration is legitimizing the alt-right movement in an effort to void past social victories and impose a new normative upon us. Those who live outside of this “new” normative — which is really an old normative rearing its ugly head — are discriminated and legislated against. Originating in social amnesia, and enforced in the law, what is “good” and what is “right” becomes naturalized – we start to believe people have always been heterosexual and cisgender, men have always had political authority, women have always belonged in the [Read More]